Save the Bees, Please!

The declining honey bee population has been brought to the attention of the media in the last couple of years.

Lately, the public has seen a lot of outcry about the disappearance of bees. While some people might see this as a good sign because they don’t want to be stung by bees anymore, this decline in the bee population will have tremendous impacts all over the world.

According to sos-bees.org, this isn’t a new trend. The decline in the honey bee population has actually been observed since the late 1990s.

The declining bee population was first recorded in Europe, but as time passes The United States has started to see the same phenomenon occurring.

A question that is commonly asked is why should we care about the declining bee population now? Here are some facts that that might change how people view this loss in the environment.

According to www.nrdc.org, honey bees are the pollinators that the world relies on for various foods like apples, almonds, several types of berries and more. If honey bees were to become extinct food scarcity throughout the world would rise significantly and food prices would surge.

Who would have thought such a tiny insect would change the world so much?

According to www.bbc.com, bees pollinate 70 to 100 crop species that feed 90 percent of the world, and if you didn’t think they were important enough honey bees are responsible for $30 billion a year in crops.

So what can the public do to help save the bees? It’s actually pretty simple.

According to www.cnn.com, people should reduce their use of bee-killing pesticides. These pesticides might be able to drift over to blooming plants, which in turn could kill the bee trying to pollinate that plant.

Another easy way to help save the bee population is to plant flowers and other plants throughout the year. According to news.nationalgeographic.com, some bee species are active all year (spring, summer, fall), so make sure they have something to feed on!

While bees might seems like a nuisance they really are a huge contributor to our environment. Next time a bee flies by, be sure to thank them for their hard work!

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